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Books

Three Days to Dead by Kelly Meding

Free of revisions (until I get feedback from my lovely betas), I was finally able to crack open Three Days to Dead. It was definitely worth the wait. Meding’s unique take on gargoyles and bridge trolls was, I admit, my favourite aspect of the book. I love it when urban fantasy takes an old idea and manages to make it seem completely new. I haven’t seen much in the way of gargoyles since our beloved 90’s cartoon and all I can say is, “More, please.”

I also thought sticking Evy in Chalice’s body was a genius way to soften and throw off balance a character which might have been almost too tough had she gone through the book in her original body.

A Complicated Kindness by Miriam Toews

I’m a bit on the fence about A Complicated Kindness. I can see why critics flocked to it and why it so quickly became a book everyone was talking about. I’m not sure, however, why it seems to be ranked higher in poplar esteem than The Flying Troutmans (which I read a few weeks later and fell deeply in love with).

Part of what I loved about The Flying Troutmans was how wonderfully Toews writing style lent itself to interactions and conversations. Perhaps that’s why I prefer it to A Complicated Kindness which is very much about isolation and living inside of one’s head.

In the end, though, I’m still in love with Toew’s style and voice and feel a little spark of joy that she’s Canadian.

Movies

Sherlock Holmes

Insert a weary sigh here. There’s nothing more disappointing to me than a movie which has all the elements of greatness but, somehow, manages to put people to sleep. Robert Downey Jr was, as expected, a fun package of untidiness Rachel McAdams was gorgeous and engaging in a role that was both larger and more important than the previews let on. . Jude Law was, as always, perfectly capable.

But it didn’t work. The city seemed dull, the gags played out fast, and the action scenes seemed repetitive (except for one slaughterhouse scene which was actually the 5 minutes I sat up a little straighter). The occult plot did nothing to help.

Peter Travers summed it up pretty well in Rolling Stone: “Downey is irresistible. The movie, not so much.”